Maldives ex-Pres Nasheed urges strong foreign intervention

Maldives ex-Pres Nasheed urges strong foreign intervention

SAM Staff,
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Mohamed Nasheed

Former president of Maldives Mohamed Nasheed has claimed the island nation is ‘in need’ of strong foreign intervention in the country’s political affairs and added that foreign intervention ideally tries to identify and rid a given country’s most prolific tension.

The ex-president went to popular social network Twitter to express his strong support for a foreign intervention in the Indian Ocean archipelago.

“When considering an intervention, major powers ask themselves ‘what comes next?’ In Maldives, we need robust intervention; ‘what next’ is free and fair elections, and mechanisms to strengthen Independent Institutions and safeguard Constitutional rights,” Nasheed tweeted.

Following the government’s strong aversion of what seemed like a sudden surge in the Maldives opposition’s political movement; the Supreme Court order on February 1 citing release of nine political prisoners including Nasheed as well, the self-exiled former president had on multiple occasions urged from international community to exact a foreign intervention in Maldives.

He tried seeking assistance from India and US when he tweeted speaking on behalf of Maldivian public, stating India should “send envoy, backed by its military, to release judges and political detainees including President Gayoom. We request a physical presence.”

He also requested the US to “stop all financial transactions of Maldives regime leaders going through US banks.”

The former head of state was tried and convicted of terrorism for the abduction of a Criminal Court judge during his administration. Court imposed a 13 year jail sentence on Nasheed and was imprisoned for the offense.

However he escaped his incarceration after reaching foreign soil seeking medical attention. Since then he had been residing in UK under self-imposed exile making frequent visits to Sri Lanka to keep a close watch on political developments in Maldives.

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