Bhutanese conjoined twins to undergo separation surgery

Bhutanese conjoined twins to undergo separation surgery

SAM Staff,
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Fourteen-month-old Nima and Dawa Pelden, supported by their mum, flew from their remote Himalayan region home in Bhutan to Melbourne on Tuesday, report Australian media.

The girls are looking forward a separation surgery as, reports say, doctors are confident they will get a new life.

Their ‘life-saving surgery’ evokes the story of Nepalese twins, Ganga and Jamuma, who were separated in Singapore in 2001 that drew global attention.

Nima and Dawa were born conjoined at the chest facing each other and scans carried out in Bhutan suggested they shared a liver, wrote ABCNet Australia.

“Mum said the girls are getting a little frustrated with each other,” Children First Foundation chief executive Elizabeth Lodge was quoted by The Australian.

“The girls are losing weight. They’ve been in hospital in recent weeks getting some extra nutrition so mum’s really keen for them to get here [in Melbourne].”

A team of six surgeons and dozens of specialist nurses have been assembled for what is likely to be a lengthy operation on the twins, according to 9News.

It said the Royal Children’s Hospital is offering the surgery to the Children First Foundation at a humanitarian rate but it will still cost more than $250,000. The foundation reportedly raised the fund.

The aim of the surgery is to separate the girls in a single surgery, hospital head paediatric surgeon Joe Crameri told reporters on Tuesday. “We just want to facilitate a good outcome for these twins to go home and live a normal life.”

Nine years ago surgeons at the hospital successfully separated Bangladeshi sisters Trishna and Krishna, who had been joined at the head, recalled The Australian.

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